The Josie Bones roasted 1/2 pig’s head

The Josie Bones roasted 1/2 pig’s head

I don’t know many people who don’t like Pork Crackling…

Josie Bones
Josie Bones’ Bar

 

Other than the previously mentioned fried dried fish skins and possibly jerky there are few more appealing beer snacks.

What if your pork crackling resembled a pigs face? How would you feel about cutting into it and nomming on it then? Luckily for me, I don’t suffer from the common “I can’t eat it if it has a face” dilemma so when a friend recommended I try the roasted 1/2 pigs head at Josie Bones in Smith Street Collingwood I jumped at the chance!

Roasted pig's head
The epic pig’s head

For the unacquainted Josie Bones is known for its approach to cooking the whole animal and using beer when appropriate to cook. They also stock a ridiculously large menu of local and imported beers and are willing to recommend according to your taste.

As any large piece of meat should, it takes a while for a pig’s head to come out of the kitchen, so naturally it made sense to order a couple of the “bites” items off the menu beforehand and a couple of beers. Oysters natural, Quail Egg and Leek and Bone Marrow croquettes. Other than the oysters being incredibly fresh the other two dishes were nice but not outstanding. It left us wanting more.

You ask and you shall receive! When the pig’s head arrived we almost regretted ordering entrees as… it’s a beast! Seriously a pig’s head is really quite a thing to behold in real life, well… roasted life. The ear, the huge jaw complete with teeth, the snout and the delicious looking cheek that you could just tell would hold such juicy meat, it was very exciting and a little overwhelming deciding where to begin!

Roasted pig's cheek
The cheek

We started on the cheek, the skin gave way under the sharp knife with a satisfying crack and pop and the meat complete with crunchy skin atop lifted away from the bone with little effort. It was served with a jus (well I think it was a jus!) which cut through the very salty flavour very nicely and let’s just say that cheek was demolished in a time that would be the envy of most competition eaters!

The Kipfler potatoes on the side and seasoned rocket were mostly ignored amongst the mountain of pork, however it was nice to munch on something else to break the flavour up at points. We were recommended to try a certain beer with the pork, a sweet and sour beer called HaandBryggeriet. Whilst I understand the concept of the sweet and sour matching well with the pork, it didn’t quite do it for me. It’s a VERY strong-tasting beer that leaves a rather strong aftertaste which coupled with salty pork has more flavour overload than an original sour warhead. A pint of apple cider however… magic!

Sweet and Sour Beer
Sweet and Sour Beer

It really is surprising how much meat is on a head, other than the obvious cheek and snout it was surprising that around the eye socket and forehead held quite a bit of flesh, all with varying strengths of pork taste and all covered in more crackling than you can poke a stick at… no we didn’t eat all the crackling, I’m pretty sure if we did I’d be writing this from a cardiac arrest ward.

All in all between two people we ate the majority of the meat and I would say if you wanted a hearty meal for two with no entree this would suit most people. OR as the waitress suggested it would be an amazing thing for a larger party to order and share.

Pig's head bones
The Finished Head

 

One thing I really liked about the place was the fact that we did not feel rushed to leave. I’ve been to so many Melbourne restaurants that are happy to serve you dinner, get your drinks and the bill then rush you out of there to seat the next group. Whilst I understand it’s in the nature of the business, it’s nice to sit back after such a meal with another drink and not feel pressured to exit the building.

Definitely an experience!

Let’s get our hands dirty

Let’s get our hands dirty

Ethiopian food is something new to me…

I need to recommend a certain restaurant I REALLY enjoyed the other day!

Highly recommended by various Internet sources, I found myself at “The Abyssinian” in Kensington one Friday night who serve up Ethiopian and Eritrean cuisine “From the Horn of Africa”. It was suggested to order the chef’s meat platter selection, to which we were greeted with an absolutely MASSIVE plate of food…

Spicy lamb, beans, white lentils, goat, dark lentils, chicken casserole, roasted spicy pumpkin, and fish all served upon delicious Injera bread that has the consistency of a bubbly thick crepe with a tart but not too strong vinegary but also sweet taste. I’ll have to eat there again to remember all the names…

Some of the spices are were not for the faint hearted in fact the lamb was pretty darn hot on the spice-o-meter, but all the meat just fell apart in the mouth, even the goat which I have previously found gamey and tough, was not chewy in the slightest.

The entire meal reflected flavours that have been honed to perfection for donkeys years, which i would describe as comforting food that feeds the senses. The colours, the smells, and the tastes all blend together, and it was impossible to find a dish on the plate that didn’t go beautifully with all the others…

Except the salad, not sure it belonged there with what tasted similar to an Italian style dressing poured over it… That said you could have rolled me down the street afterwards from the amount of food consumed so there’s not much point getting hung up over a few lettuce leaves!

There is also something incredibly satisfying about not having to use cutlery to eat… The bread that covers up the plate is your cutlery and does a better job than a spoon would in mopping up all the sauces… my top also did a great job, bibs would be a great idea when eating with your hands, especially if you’re as clumsy as I am!

Got a hot tip from the restaurant boss too… Each restaurant has its own signature dishes so it’s a good idea to try as many of them as you can as they all have something different to try…

Challenge accepted!

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Check out The Abyssinian on Urbanspoon:
The Abyssinian on Urbanspoon